Go Girl! Online Picture Book Club

$20.00$1,095.00

Runs January 24, 2020-April 10, 2020

All of the books this semester celebrate the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment, giving women the right to vote. Many women have had to make risky choices in order to further their causes and personal missions. This 12-book selection will help you teach choice, using picture books in the classroom. Because decision-making is an important component of the world of Economics and Financial Literacy, you are asked to read each book and articulate how you would plan to use the book to teach about informed decision-making in your classroom. Books will be released each Friday, beginning January 24, 2020 and continuing through April 10, 2020.

During the course, you’ll be provided a website link, which allows you to participate in a weekly discussion with other educators reading the same book.

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SKU: N/A Category:

Runs January 24, 2020-April 10, 2020

Time & Place: Online

University Course: ECED-6014, Implementing Economics and Social Studies

Graduate Credits Available: Yes

University Course: ECED-6014, Implementing Economics and Social Studies 

All of the books this semester celebrate the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment, giving women the right to vote. Many women have had to make risky choices in order to further their causes and personal missions. This 12-book selection will help you teach choice, using picture books in the classroom. Because decision-making is an important component of the world of Economics and Financial Literacy, you are asked to read each book and articulate how you would plan to use the book to teach about informed decision-making in your classroom. Books will be released each Friday, beginning January 24, 2020 and continuing through April 10, 2020.

During the course, you’ll be provided a website link, which allows you to participate in a weekly discussion with other educators reading the same book. This is not Facebook. Some of the books might not be available through your public library. An alternative is to search for the title on YouTube, and listen to the book that way.

There are twelve books assigned in this course. In order to obtain credit or the CEUs, you must respond to at least ten of the twelve books.

January 24, 2020

Dear Girl, by Amy Krouse Rosenthal and Paris Rosenthal 

Dear Girl is a remarkable love letter written for the special girl in your life; a gentle reminder that she’s powerful, strong, and holds a valuable place in the world. Through Amy and Paris’s charming text and Holly Hatam’s stunning illustrations, any girl reading this book will feel that she’s great just the way she is–whether she enjoys jumping in a muddy puddle, has a face full of freckles, or dances on table tops. Dear Girl encourages girls to always be themselves and to love who they are–inside and out.

Question:  How could any trait become one that could help you teach about scarcity in the classroom?

January 31, 2020

The Girl Who Thought in Pictures, by Julie Finley Mosca

Meet Dr. Temple Grandin–one of the world’s quirkiest science heroes! When young Temple was diagnosed with autism, no one expected her to talk, let alone become one of the most powerful voices in modern science. Yet, the determined visual thinker did just that. Her unique mind allowed her to connect with animals in a special way, helping her invent groundbreaking improvements for farms around the globe!

Question:  How does the power of choice  impact this story?

February 7, 2020

 Superheroes are Everywhere by Kamala Harris

Before Kamala Harris became a district attorney, a United States senator, and a presidential candidate, she was a little girl who loved superheroes. And when she looked around, she was amazed to find them everywhere! In her family, among her friends, even down the street–there were superheroes wherever she looked. And those superheroes showed her that all you need to do to be a superhero is to be the best that you can be. In this empowering and joyful picture book that speaks directly to kids, Kamala Harris takes readers through her life and shows them that the power to make the world a better place is inside all of us.

 Question:  Does supply and demand have anything to do with her life?

February 14, 2020

The Girl with a Mind for Math, by Julia Finley Mosca

After touring a German submarine in the early 1940s, young Raye set her sights on becoming an engineer. Little did she know sexism and racial inequality would challenge that dream every step of the way, even keeping her greatest career accomplishment a secret for decades. Through it all, the gifted mathematician persisted–finally gaining her well-deserved title in history: a pioneer who changed the course of ship design forever.

Question:  How would you describe Raye’s contribution to the economy through her career accomplishments?

February 21, 2020

The Day You Begin, by Jacqueline Woodson

There will be times when you walk into a room and no one there is quite like you. There are many reasons to feel different. Maybe it’s how you look, talk, or where you’re from; maybe it’s what you eat, or something just as random. It’s not easy to take those first steps into a place where nobody really knows you yet, but somehow you do it. Jacqueline Woodson’s lyrical text and Rafael Lopez’s dazzling art reminds us that we all feel like outsiders sometimes-and how brave it is that we go forth, anyway.

Question:   How could you use this book to teach about opportunity cost?  

February 28, 2020

She’s Got This, by Laurie Hernandez

This is a picture book about chasing your dreams and never giving up. Even Olympians have to start somewhere. And in this charming illustrated book, Laurie Hernandez tells the story of Zoe, a little girl who dreams of flying, and becoming a gymnast. When Zoe sees a gymnast on TV, she realizes that gymnastics is just like flying. But when she first goes to class and falls off the balance beam, she discovers that following her dreams is harder and scarier than she thought.

Question:  This is another story that could incorporate opportunity cost into the discussion.  What choice did Zoe have to make and what would have been the opportunity cost of that choice?

March 6, 2020

Blueberry Girl, by Neil Gaiman

A much-loved baby grows into a young woman: brave, adventurous, and lucky. Exploring, traveling, bathed in sunshine, surrounded by the wonders of the world. What every new parent or parent-to-be dreams of for her child, and what every girl dreams of for herself.

Question:  We make decisions every day.  How would you use this story to teach your students about trade-offs?

March 13, 2020

 Mae Among The Stars, by Roda Ahmed

When Little Mae was a child, she dreamed of dancing in space. She imagined herself surrounded by billions of stars, floating, gliding, and discovering. She wanted to be an astronaut. Her mom told her, “If you believe it, and work hard for it, anything is possible.” Little Mae’s curiosity, intelligence, and determination, matched with her parents’ encouraging words, paved the way for her incredible success at NASA as the first African American woman to travel in space.

Question:  Is there a way that you could relate this book to financial literacy?

March 20, 2019                                

The Girl and the Bicycle, by Mark Pett

A little girl sees a shiny new bicycle in the shop window. She hurries home to see if she has enough money in her piggy bank, but when she comes up short, she knocks on the doors of her neighbors, hoping to do their yard work. They all turn her away except for a kindly old woman. The woman and the girl work through the seasons, side by side. They form a tender friendship. When the weather warms, the girl finally has enough money for the bicycle. She runs back to the store, but the bicycle is gone! What happens next shows the reward of hard work and the true meaning of generosity.

Question:  This  story includes many financial literacy connections.  Can you think of one?

March 27, 2020               

The Girl Who Wouldn’t Brush Her Hair, by Kate Bernheimer

What happens when one little girl refuses to brush her long, beautiful hair? Well, one day, a mouse comes to live in a particularly tangled lock. Soon after, more mice move in, and the girl’s unruly mop is transformed into a marvelous mouse palace complete with secret passageways and a cheese cellar! She loves her new companions; they tell knock-knock jokes and are sweet to her doll, Baby, but as the girl comes to find out, living with more than a hundred mice atop your head isn’t always easy!  Here’s a fantastic tale that will have kids poring over the mice’s elaborate world within the girl’s wild, ever-changing hairdo.

Question:  There is a great lesson on opportunity cost in this book.  What is it?

April 3, 2020

  Maple, by Lori Nichols

When Maple is tiny, her parents plant a maple tree in her honor. She and her tree grow up together, and even though a tree doesn’t always make an ideal playmate, it doesn’t mind when Maple is in the mood to be loud, which is often! Then Maple becomes a big sister, and finds that babies have their loud days, too. Fortunately, Maple and her beloved tree know just what the baby needs. Lori Nichols’ enchanting debut features an irresistible, free-spirited, little girl who greets the changing seasons and a new sibling with arms wide open.

Question:   This book engages the reader through the imagination.  Is the imagination something that can be marketed and sold?

April 10, 2020

Ladybug Girl, by David Soman

This is the last book for this semester.  Ladybug Girl has outgrown her favorite pair of boots! So her mom takes her to the shoe store to buy another pair. Children will learn their colors with Ladybug Girl as she tries on new boots–until she finds the perfect pair!

Question:  How is the power of choice taught through this book?

 

 

Additional information

Graduate Credit Options

Non-credit participation fee, 1 Semester Hour, 2 Semester Hours, 3 Semester Hours